3 Upcoming events


24 May 17 — 26 May 17

09:30 — 17:15

London, United Kingdom

Conference

Venue:

Birkbeck College
University of London
Malet Street
London
WC1E 7HX
United Kingdom


City University of New York

Languages of Internationalism Conference Permalink

Organised in collaboration with Dr. Brigid O’Keeffe from Brooklyn College, CUNY, the Reluctant Internationalists project’s final conference will bring together historians, anthropologists, literary scholars, linguists, and scholars in related fields, to debate the languages of internationalism.

The conference aims to shed light on the centrality of language to people’s past pursuit and experiences of internationalism. For any agents of internationalism, language presented a wide variety of challenges and opportunities. It imposed obstacles and provided avenues to mutual understanding and collaboration among diverse peoples. The relative successes and failures of past internationalist projects in large measure owed to participants’ ability to effectively communicate across not just linguistic, but also political, cultural, economic, and professional boundaries. This fundamental and literal question of (mis)communication has dramatically shaped the lives of peoples variously confronting the global realities or pretensions of their milieus.

The conference is free and open to all, however spaces are strictly limited and booking is required. Please reserve a place here. Details of the conference are outlined below or to download the conference programme in full, click here.

Wednesday, 24 May 2017

Panel 1: International Languages 1.30-3.00pm
  • Brigid O’Keeffe (Brooklyn College), Hopeful Conversations in a Future Foreclosed: The Rise and Fall of Esperanto in the Early Soviet Union
  • Valeska Huber (German Historical Institute London), One Language for All? Basic English and the power and limits of a Global Language
  • Claire Shaw (University of Bristol), Sign without Borders?: The Gestuno Project and the Deaf Cold War
  • Discussant: Humphrey Tonkin (University of Hartford)
Panel 2: Languages of Empire and Its Aftermath 3.15-4.45 pm
  • Allison Korinek (New York University), Constructing the French Imperial Interprétariat in Algeria
  • Justin Jackson (New York University), Colonial Military Intermediaries: Interpreters and the Work of Local Linguistic Knowledge in U.S. Wars and Occupations in Cuba and the Philippines, 1898-1913
  • Monika Baár (Leiden University), The Communication Problem of the Non-Aligned Movement
  • Discussant: Ana Antic (University of Exeter)

Thursday, 25 May 2017

Panel 1: Cold War (Mis-)Communication 9.00 – 11.00am
  • Pey-Yi Chu (Pomona College), Puzzling over Permafrost: Negotiating Language in the Earth Sciences During the Cold War
  • Beatrice Wayne (New York University), “What is the Tongue of Radicalism?”: Peace Corps Teachers and Ethiopian Students Approaching the Revolution
  • Dina Fainberg (City, University of London), Pens instead of Projectiles: Peaceful Coexistence and the Transformation of Soviet International Reporting in the Cold War, 1953-1963
  • Diana Georgescu (University College London), Lost in Translation? The Language(s) and Practices of Internationalism in Youth Camps during the Cold War
  • Discussant: Dora Vargha (University of Exeter)
Panel 2: Searching for a Shared Language 11.15am – 12.45pm
  • Marc Volovici (Princeton University), The Many Faces of “Kongressdeutsch”: German as a Zionist Lingua Franca
  • Nick Underwood (University of Colorado Boulder), Yiddish and Transnational Linguistic Belonging in Interwar Paris
  • Carmen Mangion (Birkbeck, University of London), Internationalism and the Language of Governance
  • Discussant: David Brydan (Birkbeck, University of London)
Panel 3: The Languages of International Feminism 1.30-3.00pm
  • Jocelyn Olcott (Duke University), Lost in Translation: International Women’s Year and the Languages of Transnational Feminisms
  • Christine Varga-Harris (Illinois State University), Between Friends: The Language of Gender Equality and “Sisterhood” in Encounters among Soviet and “Third-World” Women
  • Emma Lundin (Birkbeck, University of London), Adapting Feminism: Swedish and South African political activists’ use of second-wave vocabulary 1968-1994
  • Discussant:  Philippa Hetherington (University College London)
Panel 4: Language and Expertise in International Organisations 3.15-5.15pm
  • Heidi Tworek (University of British Columbia), Coded Language: Health,Statistics, and Telegraphic Communication at the League of Nations
  • Jo Laycock (Sheffield Hallam University) Speaking the Language of Humanitarianism or ‘speaking Bolshevik’: International Refugee relief in Soviet Armenia 1920-1928
  • Humphrey Tonkin (University of Hartford) & Lisa McEntee-Atalianis (Birkbeck, University of London), The Emergence of UN Language Policy
  • Sebastian Gehrig (Oxford), The Languages of National Division: Shaping hegemonic semantics of divide in the struggle between the two German states, 1949-89
  • Discussant: Jessica Reinisch (Birkbeck, University of London)

Friday, 26 May 2017

Panel 1: Reading and Translating Across Borders 9.30 – 11.00am
  • Katherine M. H. Reischl (Princeton University), Translating Images: The Visual Life of M. Il’in’s The Story of the Great Plan
  • Rossen Djagalov (New York University), Figures of Internationalism in the Third-World Novel
  • Yuliya Komska (Dartmouth College), How International Is the Language of Action? The Global Publishing History of H.A. and Magret Rey’s Curious George at Its Limits
  • Discussant: Sophie Heywood (University of Reading)
Panel 2: Languages of Socialist Internationalism 11.15am – 1.15pm
  • Stephen Smith (University of Oxford), International Communism and the Barriers of Language
  • Eleonor Gilburd (University of Chicago), The Language of Culture
  • Elidor Mëhilli (Hunter College), The Power of Russian: Ideology, Literacy, and Socialist Internationalism before and after the Sino-Soviet Split
  • Rachel Applebaum (Tufts University), The “Gate to the World”: Russian as a Foreign Language in Cold War Czechoslovakia
  • Discussant: Johanna Conterio (Flinders University)
Panel 3: Concluding Roundtable 2.15 – 3.15pm

30 Jul 17 — 11 Aug 17

09:00 — 18:00

Cambridge, United Kingdom

Course

Venue:

Hilton Cambridge City Centre

2017 Cambridge Conference Interpretation Course (CCIC) Permalink

Continuing education course for professional conference interpreters in Cambridge, United Kingdom - 33rd intensive course in the practice of simultaneous conference interpretation.     

For further information, details of fees and enrolment forms, please see: www.cciconline.net

Or contact:

  • Christopher Guichot de Fortis, Tel: (+32) 49 53 44 707 or email: c.guichot@knwpqmjj3.aiic.net
  • Julia Poger, Tel: (+32) 49 65 69 078

Course Directors (AIIC) include:
  • Patsy Arizu, former Head of Interpretation, US Department of State
  • Loreto Bravo de Urquia, former Head of Interpretation Services, OPCW
  • Marie Diur, Head of Interpretation, UNOV
  • Philip Evans, Senior Interpreter, NATO HQ, retired
  • Ricarda Gras, freelance interpreter
  • Christopher Guichot de Fortis, Senior Interpreter, NATO HQ
  • Beatriz Leboulleux del Castillo, freelance interpreter
  • Almute Loeber, freelance interpreter
  • Claudia Martin-Stern, freelance interpreter
  • Ricarda Mehl, Head of Interpretation Management Service, German Federal Office of Languages, Cologne
  • Elina Pekler, staff interpreter, UNHQ
  • Julia Poger, freelance interpreter
  • Claudia Ricci, freelance interpreter
  • Lucie Solem, freelance interpreter

Experience indicates that enrolment before March is highly advisable.


NB: The CCIC is specifically designed for experienced and practising conference interpreters

This unique annual professional development course for conference interpreters offers a student-teacher ratio not exceeding 2.5:1. Instruction is centred on training in simultaneous interpretation from speeches delivered by teaching faculty and guest speakers. Numerous challenging contemporary video sources are also employed. General, group and individual performance evaluation is extensive, tailored and detailed.

The CCIC’s 27 students will work some 5 hours per day in state-of-the-art 2-person ISO booths equipped with screens. A wide range of technical and general subjects (economy, geopolitics, defence, environment, philosophy, history, etc.) will be briefed under authentic conference conditions, including formal UN-format mock meetings. Several in-depth and specialised language breakout sessions, concentrating on a particular mode of interpretation and/or language pair, are also featured.

In addition to the core curriculum, daily specialised modules in a variety of fields (consecutive techniques, B-language strategies, preparation and use of texts, meeting terminology and practice, booth and stress management, marketing and negotiation, chuchotage, interpreting literature, etc.) and briefings on AIIC and the profession, are provided. Practical exercises in ‘chuchotage’ are also featured, using real-life scenarios.

We have negotiated advantageous room rates both at the Hilton Cambridge City Centre hotel venue and at nearby Christ’s College.

Course languages are: English, French, German, Italian, Russian and Spanish, according to demand, and tuition is tailored to cover the language pairs desired by students. The language of general instruction is English.


21 Aug 17 — 02 Sep 17

09:30 — 17:30

London, United Kingdom

Course

Venue:

Headquarters of the International Transport Workers Federation
Borough Road (near London Bridge)

Contact:

  • Christine Adams
  • Zoë Hewetson

Short Courses for Conference Interpreters with English B, London, August 2017 Permalink

Following successful short courses for interpreters with English B in the past three summers, Christine Adams and Zoë Hewetson are proposing to run two more in 2017. There is a felt need for opportunities for colleagues to work on their B in a practical, supportive environ- ment. The courses will run August 21-26 and August 28-September 2, 2017 and will include:

  •  simultaneous interpreting,
  •  consecutive (if requested),
  •  tailored feedback from English A course tutors,
  •  voice coaching,
  •  English enhancement,
  •  talks and debates on topical issues,
  •  speech preparation and delivery.

We will be running an Arabic A group and a German A group the first week, August 21-26, and a French A group and an Italian A group the second week, August 28-September 2. We now have a waiting list for the French A group, but we still have a few places left for Arabic, German and Italian.

Please send us both an email if you would be interested in attending, giving your A language. The courses will take place in central London and the fees are £1250.00 (which will cover tuition, not accommodation).

Do not hesitate to contact us if you have any questions. 

Christine Adams (member AIIC): ch.adams@ppeq1tber.btinternet.com 

Zoë Hewetson (member AIIC): zoehewetson@v3xc.hotmail.com